Movie review: Where To Invade Next

Movie review:  Where To Invade Next

How do we make America great again?  We do things that will upset the order and control of corporate conformity, worry less about making all the money possible and return to simple original Yankee ideas that made America the place everyone wanted to be in the first place.  Michael Moore’s entire premise is not a complicated one.  His latest film, Where To Invade Next, begins with a day dream sequence of him being summoned to the Pentagon for a conference with the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  Mr. Moore suggests they end their quandary of how to execute their next mission by sending him instead of the Marines to wherever.  Michael then sets off to conquer and recapture from places he can mostly pronounce correctly ideas that, as it turns out, originated in...

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The enduring body of work of David Bowie

The enduring body of work of David Bowie

Music forms a tapestry that serves as a backdrop of life.  Of all the minutia that composes the composite of modern human identity, music often reveals much regarding a person’s history, character and personal disposition.  Music has a unique way of touching the human soul, imprinting on the psyche association with other people, places, times and circumstances.  Two weeks ago when I learned of the sad news of the death of the entertainer David Bowie, I noticed I still had The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars loaded in my CD player.  When I thought about how long I had been a fan of David Bowie, a musician I saw as the embodiment of the consummate rock star, I felt like I had lost part my own history.  That is the beautiful thing...

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Movie review: Trumbo

Movie review:  Trumbo

A little slow down over the holiday this past week gave me and a few friends the opportunity to take in a feature presentation at Tulsa’s Circle Cinema in historic Whittier Square.  Showing on Screen 2 on Thanksgiving Night was director Jay Roach’s biopic Trumbo, a dramatization of the life, work and struggles of blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo.  Actor Bryan Cranston delivers a convincing performance in the title role.  Trumbo, an A-List screenwriter with a strong social conscience, took a stand against the abuses of capitalism on American workers as well as rising European fascism in the 1930s and eventually joined the Communist Party (CPUSA) in 1943.  I love the way he dealt with the cognitive dissonance posed by his wealth and his...

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Movie review: The Stanford Prison Experiment

Movie review:  The Stanford Prison Experiment

You only deserve as much abuse as you are willing to tolerate.  That has become one of my personal credos over the years.  Director Kyle Patrick Alvarez validated this for me once again in his docudrama The Stanford Prison Experiment.  I attended a matinee showing of this film at Circle Cinema in Whittier Square this week.  I must say that it was a somewhat difficult two hours to sit through.  The story focus is an experiment planned for two weeks that was ended after six days.  Before the film’s end I fully understood why. The Stanford Prison Experiment is a dramatization of the actual experiment constructed and directed by Stanford University psychology professor Dr. Phillip Zimbardo.  I vividly recall reading about this in my first junior college...

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Movie review: The Water Diviner

Movie review:  The Water Diviner

War is definitely the gift that keeps on giving.  It was appropriate that The Water Diviner, a fictional post-World War I historical drama, opened the day before the 100th anniversary of the start of the military campaign which inspired it.  Russell Crowe directs and acts in the lead role and seems to gain a measure of redemption after foundering in Les Miserables. The Gallipoli Campaign was, as one of the movie’s characters aptly describes, a battle lost by the British Army in a war won by the Allies.  The story begins in the NW Victoria home of the parents of three Australian soldiers who fought at Gallipoli some four years after the battle.  Australian farmer Joshua Connor (played by Crowe) who possesses the skill of locating water in arid places and his...

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Documentary Film Review: Children of the Civil Rights

Documentary Film Review:  Children of the Civil Rights

President Harry Truman once said, “The only thing new in this world is the history that you don’t know.”  On this fiftieth anniversary commemoration of Bloody Sunday in Selma, Circle Cinema held a special showing of the documentary film Children of the Civil Rights.  It was indeed a celebration of a piece of not so much forgotten but often overlooked history of how then pervasive Jim Crow laws in Oklahoma were protested and how enough people quietly displaying their objection to them eventually led to their ultimate abolishment.  I must admit that it was something that I never was exposed to in Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa Junior College or the University of Oklahoma.  It was made much more real to me as a few of those who were actually part of...

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